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About Richard Bearne
Richard Bearne is the Chairman of Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood, specialising in books and manuscripts. He regularly undertakes valuations for both insurance and probate purposes.
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The material published in this web log is for general purposes only. It does not constitute nor is it intended to represent professional advice. You should always seek specific professional advice in relation to particular issues. The information in this web log is provided "as is" with no warranties and confers no rights. The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions.

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Review Entries for Day Monday, February 18, 2013

Ok, so who doesn’t still love children’s books, whatever your age? I still enjoy looking through the pages of my old Babar books and, of course, Winnie the Pooh, where there are some very wise words to glean, so I was very excited to see that we have a great collection of pop up books and moveables in the forthcoming auction of Antiquarian books on 20th February 2013 at the Dowell Street Saleroom in Honiton, East Devon.

 

Moveable books were originally designed for adults rather than children. It is thought that the first moveable mechanics were used in a book in 1306 for an astrological book.

 

The techniques used for pop up books and moveable books has been used for centuries, but mainly for scholarly books, rather than for entertainment and fun.

 

It wasn’t until 18th Century that these were developed for children and for fun and were extremely popular during the 19th Century, but it wasn’t until the early 20th Century that things really changed. During the 20th Century, pop up books literally popped up everywhere.

 

The pop up books on offer in the Children’s and Illustrated section of the Antiquarian book auction are in a few lots and are all in excellent condition.

 

The first of these is an unusual collection of pop-up books (BK9/76), of various shapes and sizes, all in excellent and unused condition. Some of the titles include The Night Before Christmas by Clement Clarke Moore, with illustrations by Penny Ives, dated 1988, and a pop-up Winnie-The-Pooh, with decorations after the style of Ernest H Shepard. The estimate on this fun lot in the Antiquarian book auction, which includes twenty one volumes in total is £50-£80.

 

 a selection of pop-up books on offer in the antiquarian book auction

 

A selection of the pop-up books on offer in the Antiquarian Book Auction.

 

Another super example is The Model Menagerie by the German publisher Ernest Nister (BK9/90), dating from circa 1900. This novel picture book of wild animals consists of six intricate 3D pop-ups. It is in nice fresh condition with highly decorative boards. I will be looking for bids between £100-£160.

 

 

 

The Model Menagerie

 

There are many other great children’s books in this Antiquarian book auction to be held at our salerooms on 20th February 2013 in Dowell Street, Honiton, East Devon.

 

I look forward to seeing many of you there!

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Monday, February 18, 2013 10:40:51 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
Comments [8] Children's Books | Illustrated Books | Trackback

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:07:32 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
Great article but it didn't have everything-I didn't find the ktichen sink!
Wednesday, March 27, 2013 5:42:21 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
FqidrX <a href="http://wsruufqhrisc.com/">wsruufqhrisc</a>
Wednesday, April 03, 2013 2:22:16 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
Yes as you say Stratford has never been a back water, the topography provided a fortunate position. The river represents the dividing line between the Southern &#8220;Feldon&#8221; or champion lands with it&#8217;s rich fertile soil and the Northern forest of Arden equally rich in timber and pasture. And there in between is the perfect place for a market to bring all this wealth together. The bridge is built over the remnants of the original Roman ford, so it has been the place to cross the river for at least 2000 years.Drovers would take their animals south to Banbury or London from Wales or the North passing through the town, so Shakespeare had a cavalcade of people to observe as they passed by, much as we do today in fact. It would be great to see what he would write today.

Tuesday, April 09, 2013 5:45:29 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
As a librarian who receives many donations at my place of work, I would like to ask people to please think carefully before donating books that are older than roughly 10 years. While some few may be of value, most will not be, and it can be expensive for us to dispose of them&#8211;we cannot recycle with regular trash pickup, but have to transport them to Ash Trading in Menands, which will accept both hardcovers and paperbacks for recycling. I know it is very hard to believe those 200 books you loved in the 1970s and 80s are not worth anything, but they probably aren&#8217;t. We don&#8217;t add books to our collection if they are yellowed or musty, which they often are. We do sell some donations, but they go for 50 cents at our book sale. A few can be sold on Amazon, but we check first to see what the lowest used price offered there is&#8211;often 1 cent, believe it or not. And please, please, please&#8211;smell the books before donating them! Especially if they were stored in a basement. Even if they never got wet, they can have a very strong odor!We do, however, love to get copies of very current bestsellers that still have request waiting lists, paperbacks published in the last 5 years, and just about any DVDs or CDs. Call your library to see what they need and be honest about the condition, number and age of books you have.

Saturday, April 13, 2013 6:24:06 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
Hello,I am trying to find out more about the history of a piano that is in my possession. On the soundboard of the piano there is an inscription in German:C. Bechstein&gt; &gt; FLÜGEL -U PIANINO &#8211; FABRIK&gt; &gt; SR. MAJESTÄT DER KÖNIGN VON ENGLAND&gt; &gt; I.K.K.H. DER FRAU KRONPRINZESS IN PRINCESS ROYAL OF GREAT BRITIAN AND&gt; &gt; IRELAND&gt; &gt; SR. KÖNIGL HOHEIT DES PRINZEN FRIEFRICH CARL VON PREUSSEN UND SR.&gt; &gt; KÖNIGL HOHEIT DES HERZOGS VON EDINBURG&gt; &gt; BERLIN&gt; &gt; ERSTE-FABRIK: JOHONNIS &#8211; STR. NO. 5-7,&gt; &gt; ZWEITE &#8211; FABRIK: GRUNAUER &#8211; STR. NO. 21Moreover, there is a serial number 2424 etched into the main body on the underside. I contacted Bechstein a few years ago and they informed me that from the serial number they could tell me the piano was manufactured between 1885 and 1887.Thank you for the help and let me know if you have any further questions.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 5:45:43 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
Well written article Tandava!Hinduism&#8217;s beacon has always been lit for all who seek a refuge within. Over two hundred years of colonial rule in India (plus a total of a thousand years of Invasion wars) has left the Hindus under that thick blanket of the self-denial fog. The mental enslavement is still there in the guise of being tolerant and universal (and many other reasons). Seekers are either mis-led by cults or pushed back to the faith in which they are born into even if they do not have any roots there. So, Hinduism needs to perhaps advertise itself just as the Buddhists have over the last two decades. And perhaps not in the same trend as some of the other religions have. There is also an urgent need for Yoga teachers in the world make their students aware of yoga&#8217;s Hindu roots and it&#8217;s practical purposes of going within.Hinduism Today magazine has carried out an excellent task of accurately presenting this magnificent religion &#8211; and not the magazine will also be published and sold within India. Furthermore, the Indian government is introducing tourist packages for religious sites &#8211; since it will be a financial gain for them. It might just become an opening or an introduction for sincere seekers and on-lookers into Hinduism.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 5:45:52 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
Well written article Tandava!Hinduism&#8217;s beacon has always been lit for all who seek a refuge within. Over two hundred years of colonial rule in India (plus a total of a thousand years of Invasion wars) has left the Hindus under that thick blanket of the self-denial fog. The mental enslavement is still there in the guise of being tolerant and universal (and many other reasons). Seekers are either mis-led by cults or pushed back to the faith in which they are born into even if they do not have any roots there. So, Hinduism needs to perhaps advertise itself just as the Buddhists have over the last two decades. And perhaps not in the same trend as some of the other religions have. There is also an urgent need for Yoga teachers in the world make their students aware of yoga&#8217;s Hindu roots and it&#8217;s practical purposes of going within.Hinduism Today magazine has carried out an excellent task of accurately presenting this magnificent religion &#8211; and not the magazine will also be published and sold within India. Furthermore, the Indian government is introducing tourist packages for religious sites &#8211; since it will be a financial gain for them. It might just become an opening or an introduction for sincere seekers and on-lookers into Hinduism.

Thursday, April 18, 2013 5:25:18 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)
I will take a look, though one thing that you need to realise is that nobody can be the &#8220;voice of Hinduism&#8221;. I am not even qualified to speak for my own sampradaya. If you can imagine someone trying to be the &#8220;voice of Abrahamic religions&#8221; and speaking on behalf of all Christian denominations, Mormons, Islamic denominations, all Jewish sects and movements, the Bah&#8217;ai, the Druze, Mandaeism, and secular Humanists who honour Abrahamic traditions then you will understand. Many people who have not come across Hinduism underestimate the diversity of belief, mainly because Hindus are instinctively inclusive rather than exclusive. Whereas followers of Abrahamic religions are likely to argue that Mormons, Jehovah&#8217;s Witnesses are &#8220;not true Christians&#8221;, or that Ahmadiyya are &#8220;not true Muslims&#8221;, Hindus are more likely to argue that Sikhs, Jains and Buddhists are all really part of Hinduism!

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