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About Rachel Littlewood
Rachel Littlewood is the Operations Director at Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood. She is based at Exeter in Devon.
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The material published in this web log is for general purposes only. It does not constitute nor is it intended to represent professional advice. You should always seek specific professional advice in relation to particular issues. The information in this web log is provided "as is" with no warranties and confers no rights. The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions.

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Review Entries for Day Friday, April 26, 2013

The beautiful platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring which was included in the Quarterly Fine Art Sale of fine jewellery (FS18/294) on 24th April 2013 outshone all the other jewellery items on offer in the auction.

 a platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring (fs18/294) sold for £16,500

A platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring (FS18/294) Sold for £16,500

There had been a great deal of interest in this stunning diamond ring prior to the auction, which included a good section of jewellery, but this was the star of the show, selling for £16,500.

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Friday, April 26, 2013 3:02:25 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
Comments [0] Antique Jewellery | Rings | Trackback

Review Entries for Day Thursday, April 18, 2013

The name diamond is derived from the ancient Greek word Adamas, which translates as unconquerable, unalterable and unbreakable. Diamonds are thought to have been first recognised in India in 4th Century BC, although these deposits would have been formed some 900 million years ago or more.

It is thought that until the 18th Century, India was the only known source of diamonds, but when the diamond mines of India were depleted, people started to look for other sources. Small deposits were found in Brazil, but this was not enough to keep up with the demand for what had become a hugely desirable material.

 

 a diamond single stone ring with 2.2ct stone (fs18/292)

A diamond single stone ring with 2.2ct stone (FS18/292), estimate £5,000-£7,000

It was in 1866, when Erasmus Jacobs found what he initially thought was just a pebble on the banks of the Orange River that things really changed. This 'Pebble' turned out to be a 21.25 ct diamond. A few years later a massive 83.5 ct diamond was found. This sparked a huge interest in the area and gold prospectors arrived in their thousands. This resulted in the first large scale mining operation to start, which became known as the Kimberely Mine.

This increase in supply of the precious diamonds meant that the price for them decreased and they became less popular, as people realised they were not so rare and instead started to look to coloured stones such as sapphires, emeralds and rubies.

Today, the demand for diamonds is great and they achieve some extremely good prices at auction.

 

  a diamond single stone ring (fs18/293)

A diamond single stone ring (FS18/293), estimate £8,000-£12,000

The two illustrated examples above are being offered in the fine jewellery auction on 24th April 2013, where there are some stunning stones on offer (you may have already seen my previous blog on the two stone crossover ring). The first is a single stone diamond ring (FS18/292), with circular brilliant cut diamond, measuring approximately 8.1mm x 5.2mm and estimated to weigh 2.2cts. It has a six claw setting between baguette cut diamond single stonbe shoulders and carries a pre-sale estimate of £5,000-£7,000.

The second illustrated example is again a single stone ring (FS18/293), with circular brilliant cut diamond which weighs approximately 4.5cts and is in a curtain claw setting. This beautiful ring carries a pre-sale estimate of £8,000-£12,000.

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Thursday, April 18, 2013 8:48:54 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
Comments [0] Antique Jewellery | Rings | Trackback

Amber has been much valued from antiquity to the present day and continues to be popular in our fine jewellery auctions. It is most desirable in its natural state and the larger, graduated beaded necklaces are currently of greatest interest.

Amber is a fossil resin, yellow, orange, red or brown in hue.  A more yellow, or brownish yellow translucent colour indicates that it has probably been found near a sea coast.

 

a graduated amber beaded single string necklace (fs18/195)

A graduated amber beaded single string necklace (FS18/195)

The fine jewellery auction to be held on 24th April 2013 includes a good graduated amber beaded single string necklace, together with another example (FS18/195). The pre-sale estimate is £400-£500.

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Thursday, April 18, 2013 7:45:08 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Monday, April 15, 2013

This mid 19th Century gold and foiled pink topaz necklace (FS18/238) being offered in the fine jewellery auction is beautifully crafted with it's remarkable form of antique gold work called 'Canetilled' gold. This type of work was introduced in the second decade of the 19th Century and is light and luxurious to wear.

a mid 19th century gold and foiled pink topaz necklace (fs18/238)

A mid 19th Century gold and foiled pink topaz necklace (FS18/238)

 

Mounted with pink topaz, the contrast of the gold and the pink stones works well together and gives a rich and vibrant look to the necklace. Topaz is found in many colours, with pink the rarest. To improve the colour, pale pink topaz stones were 'pinked' by foiling them with a red foil.

This antique jewellery necklace is in very good condition, which adds to its value and desirability and hence it carries a pre-sale estimate of £1,800-£2,200. It goes under the hammer on Wednesday 24th April 2013 at the saleroom in Okehampton Street, Exeter, Devon.

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Monday, April 15, 2013 8:04:22 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
Comments [0] Antique Jewellery | Gold Jewellery | Trackback

Rolex has continued today to be at the forefront of the watch making industry. The price of a Rolex wristwatch can vary according to the model and the materials used. Not long after 1931, Rolex introduced a 'perpetual' rotor that rewound a watch with every flick of the wearer's wrist. This was called 'The Oyster Perpetual'. Very popular and collectable at auction, this watch is waterproof with a tiny engine that is powered every time you move your arm.

Rolex distribute and service high quality wristwatches and these are sold under the Rolex and Tudor brands.The three lines that Rolex have produced are 'Oyster Perpetual', 'Professional' and 'Cellini'. The Cellini line is one of their more 'dressy' watch lines.

The quarterly fine sale of jewellery to be held on 24th April 2013 includes some stunning pieces of fine jewellery within the auction, but also some fantastic quality wristwatches.

 

 

A gentleman's stainless steel Oyster perpetual date submariner superlative wristwatch (FS18/171)

A good example is the gentleman's Rolex stainless steel Oyster perpetual date submariner 200m superlative chronometer officially certified wristwatch (FS18/171). The black dial has luminescent markers, red 'Submariner', 'Mercedes' hands, centre seconds and magnified date aperture. The case is numbered 3302008 and it is design number 1680.

This quality example is also being sold within the fine jewellery auction with its certificate guarantee dated 23/12/75, booklet and translation and is contained within a fitted Rolex case. The pre-sale estimate is £2,000-£3,000.

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Monday, April 15, 2013 7:53:20 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Wednesday, April 10, 2013

This diamond mounted, two stone cross-over ring is mounted with old, brilliant-cut diamonds with each stone estimated to weigh approximately 3.5cts. Old, brilliant-cut stones of this size are very desirable, the facet arrangement and proportions having been perfected by both mathematical and empirical analysis. The cut of a stone greatly impacts a diamond's brilliance, and this particular cut gives a great luminosity. 

 a platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring (fs18/294)

A platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring (FS18/294)

Typically, an increase in a diamond's carat weight would mean an increase in the value of the diamond, presuming it to be of a reasonable colour and clarity. The stones within this ring are of good colour and clarity.

Diamond mounted rings are very popular and when mounted with a beautifully cut, good quality stones, the desire for them is even greater. 

This beautiful ring is expected to fetch £15,000-£18,000 when it goes under the hammer in the Jewellery section of our Fine Art Sale on 24th April 2013 at the auction rooms in Okehampton Street, Exeter, Devon.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013 12:40:32 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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