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About Rachel Littlewood
Rachel Littlewood is the Operations Director at Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood. She is based at Exeter in Devon.
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Disclaimer
The material published in this web log is for general purposes only. It does not constitute nor is it intended to represent professional advice. You should always seek specific professional advice in relation to particular issues. The information in this web log is provided "as is" with no warranties and confers no rights. The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions.

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Review Entries for Day Thursday, June 13, 2013

Zircon mounted jewellery can be found in a wide range of colours, the most popular colour is blue,  usually a pastel blue, but some exceptional gemstones have a bright blue colour. Collectors enjoy the search for all possible colours and variations. Natural zircon is an earthy brown colour and rare to find, the reason why most zircons on the market today are heat treated.

Colour and clarity are the most important things to consider when zircons are being evaluated and they should have a very good lustre.

 

 a zircon and diamond cluster ring (fs17/310) sold for £1,100

A zircon and diamond cluster ring (FS17/310) sold for £1,100

This blue zircon and diamond set ring (FS17/310) is a good example and realised £1,100 when it went under the hammer in the quarterly fine jewellery auction.

The next fine jewellery auction on 3rd  July 2013 (FS19) in Exeter, Devon has some lovely pieces on offer and I will be previewing these in my blogs over the next month.

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Thursday, June 13, 2013 9:42:24 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
Comments [0] Antique Jewellery | Rings | Trackback

Review Entries for Day Monday, June 03, 2013

Carlo Giuliano was the foremost amongst revivalist jewellers in Europe. His jewellery became popular in the late 19th Century and he was known as the 'true Michelangelo of jewellers'. Giuliano was skilled at enamel and used opaque enamel to create delicate black and white designs within his pieces. This open work pendant  being offered through the jewellery department in the quarterly fine jewellery auction on 3rd July 2013 shown below is a good example of his skilled enamelling and precise detail.

 

 a carlo guiliano pendant (fs19/156)

A Carlo Guiliano pendant (FS19/156)

This stunning late 19th Century enamelled gold, garnet and seed-pearl pendant in original red leather fitted cased is expected to fetch £700-£900 when it goes under the hammer in the quarterly fine jewellery auction on 3rd July 2013 in Okehampton Street, Exeter.

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Monday, June 03, 2013 10:12:14 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Tuesday, May 21, 2013

French for 'Beautiful Era', Belle Epoque was a period in French and Belgian history and the brooch illustrated below is a typical example of the type of jewellery produced at this time.

 a stunning belle epoque brooch (fs18/235) sold for £3200

A stunning Belle Epoque brooch (FS18/235) Sold for £3200

The 'invisible' setting of this brooch is enabled by the strength of the platinum which compliments the lightness of fashion through out this era.
Diamonds were favoured for being set in platinum for their white-on-white colour scheme, and sense of refined elegance and luxury.

This particular brooch was offered in Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood's fine jewellery auction on 24th April 2013 and realised £3,200.

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Tuesday, May 21, 2013 10:21:50 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Georg Jensen (1866-1935) was a Danish silversmith. He began his training as a goldsmith at the age of 14 in Copenhagen.

Jensen had always wanted to be a sculptor, which is what he studied at the Royal Academy. He graduated in 1892 and he then began to exhibit his work. He found making a living out of sculpture extremely difficult, so he moved towards the applied arts and ceramics. In 1901, he began again working as a silversmith and in 1904 opened his own silversmithy in Copenhagen. Georg Jensens Art Noveau designs became very popular and well received and his outlet in Copenhagen expanded rapidly and by the end of the 1920s, Jensen had opened outlets in New York, London, Berlin, Paris and Stockholm.

Georg Jensen died in 1935 and although he was a great fan of the Art Nouveau style, he had also allowed his designers a great deal of freedom of expression, which helped his company keep up with the times and progress in the future.

 

georg jensen pendant (fs18/212)

Georg Jensen Pendant (FS18/212)

Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood sold a lovely piece of Georg Jensen in the quarterly fine jewellery auction in April 2013 in our Exeter salerooms in Devon (FS18/212) - illustrated above.  It was a silver oval pendant, of foliate design suspending a long drop. The piece was stamped Georg Jensen 925S Denmark 40 and had import marks for London 1976. This stylish pendant sold for £680 when it went under the hammer in the fine jewellery auction.

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Wednesday, May 15, 2013 8:16:07 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Sapphire, which in Greek translates as blue stone, is a gemstone variety of the the mineral corundum, which is an aluminium oxide.

 

 sapphire and diamond ring (fs18/243)

Sapphire and diamond ring (FS18/243)

Small trace amounts of other elements such as copper, iron, titanium and chromium gives the corundum a blue, purple, yellow, orange or green colour to the sapphire. Sapphires may be found naturally. They can also be manufactured. Sapphires are incredibly hard, measuring 9 on the Mohs scale and because of this they are used for many applications, such as components in scientific instruments and synthetic sapphires are used for shatter resistant windows in armoured vehicles!

The cost of natural sapphires varies depending on their colour, cut, general overall quality and size and although sapphires have many practical uses they are also commonly used for jewellery and decoration and we see them regularly in our fine jewellery auctions.

Sapphires can be found in all types of jewellery and vary in colour and size. This brooch  illustrated below in particular is mounted with a pink sapphire and is included in the next fine jewellery auction on 3rd July 2013.

 

 a pink sapphire and diamond bar brooch (fs19)

A pink sapphire and diamond bar brooch (FS19)

Pink sapphires deepen in colour as the quantity of chromium increases, the deeper the pink colour, the higher the value.  Pink Sapphires over one carat are extremely rare and are subsequently quite expensive. A sapphire which is pink can sometimes be so pink that it can be a ruby. 

Pink gem set jewellery is currently very saleable in fine jewellery auctions. Pink topaz and pink sapphires being the most sought after at auction.

This beautiful example is being offered for sale in the quarterly fine jewellery sale on 3rd July 2013.

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Tuesday, May 14, 2013 2:39:43 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Wednesday, May 01, 2013

You may remember me blogging last month about the lovely quality Rolex Oyster Perpetual Date Submariners wristwatch that Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood had coming up for sale on 24th April 2013 in the Quartlery Fine Art Sale in Exeter, Devon.

 the rolex perpetual date submariner wristwatch

 The Rolex Perpetual Date Submariner Wristwatch

Sold for £6,200

This quality piece by Rolex exceeded all expectations when it realised £6,100. There were internet bidders and telephone bidders and many people in the auction room in Exeter. It really was a stunning wristwatch, in superb condition and with its original certificate, booklet and translation and in its original fitted Rolex case, it is no wonder this superb wristwatch was in such demand. It was a stunning example of the Rolex Perpetual Date Submariner Wristwatch.

There are some good pieces of jewellery coming up for auction in the next Quarterly Fine Sale in Exeter on 3rd/4th July 2013, so keep your eyes peeled for a sneak preview in due course.

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Wednesday, May 01, 2013 10:48:13 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Friday, April 26, 2013

The beautiful platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring which was included in the Quarterly Fine Art Sale of fine jewellery (FS18/294) on 24th April 2013 outshone all the other jewellery items on offer in the auction.

 a platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring (fs18/294) sold for £16,500

A platinum and diamond two stone cross over ring (FS18/294) Sold for £16,500

There had been a great deal of interest in this stunning diamond ring prior to the auction, which included a good section of jewellery, but this was the star of the show, selling for £16,500.

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Friday, April 26, 2013 3:02:25 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Review Entries for Day Thursday, April 18, 2013

The name diamond is derived from the ancient Greek word Adamas, which translates as unconquerable, unalterable and unbreakable. Diamonds are thought to have been first recognised in India in 4th Century BC, although these deposits would have been formed some 900 million years ago or more.

It is thought that until the 18th Century, India was the only known source of diamonds, but when the diamond mines of India were depleted, people started to look for other sources. Small deposits were found in Brazil, but this was not enough to keep up with the demand for what had become a hugely desirable material.

 

 a diamond single stone ring with 2.2ct stone (fs18/292)

A diamond single stone ring with 2.2ct stone (FS18/292), estimate £5,000-£7,000

It was in 1866, when Erasmus Jacobs found what he initially thought was just a pebble on the banks of the Orange River that things really changed. This 'Pebble' turned out to be a 21.25 ct diamond. A few years later a massive 83.5 ct diamond was found. This sparked a huge interest in the area and gold prospectors arrived in their thousands. This resulted in the first large scale mining operation to start, which became known as the Kimberely Mine.

This increase in supply of the precious diamonds meant that the price for them decreased and they became less popular, as people realised they were not so rare and instead started to look to coloured stones such as sapphires, emeralds and rubies.

Today, the demand for diamonds is great and they achieve some extremely good prices at auction.

 

  a diamond single stone ring (fs18/293)

A diamond single stone ring (FS18/293), estimate £8,000-£12,000

The two illustrated examples above are being offered in the fine jewellery auction on 24th April 2013, where there are some stunning stones on offer (you may have already seen my previous blog on the two stone crossover ring). The first is a single stone diamond ring (FS18/292), with circular brilliant cut diamond, measuring approximately 8.1mm x 5.2mm and estimated to weigh 2.2cts. It has a six claw setting between baguette cut diamond single stonbe shoulders and carries a pre-sale estimate of £5,000-£7,000.

The second illustrated example is again a single stone ring (FS18/293), with circular brilliant cut diamond which weighs approximately 4.5cts and is in a curtain claw setting. This beautiful ring carries a pre-sale estimate of £8,000-£12,000.

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Thursday, April 18, 2013 8:48:54 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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Amber has been much valued from antiquity to the present day and continues to be popular in our fine jewellery auctions. It is most desirable in its natural state and the larger, graduated beaded necklaces are currently of greatest interest.

Amber is a fossil resin, yellow, orange, red or brown in hue.  A more yellow, or brownish yellow translucent colour indicates that it has probably been found near a sea coast.

 

a graduated amber beaded single string necklace (fs18/195)

A graduated amber beaded single string necklace (FS18/195)

The fine jewellery auction to be held on 24th April 2013 includes a good graduated amber beaded single string necklace, together with another example (FS18/195). The pre-sale estimate is £400-£500.

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Thursday, April 18, 2013 7:45:08 AM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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