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About Brian Goodison-Blanks
Brian Goodison-Blanks is the Head of the Maritime and Sporting Department at Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood. He is based at Honiton in Devon.
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The material published in this web log is for general purposes only. It does not constitute nor is it intended to represent professional advice. You should always seek specific professional advice in relation to particular issues. The information in this web log is provided "as is" with no warranties and confers no rights. The opinions expressed herein are my own personal opinions.

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Review Entries for Day Tuesday, July 23, 2019

As a globe maker Nathaniel Hill (fl,1746-1748) had impeccable credentials, which is why he is perhaps one of the most sought-after makers of the 18th century. Nathaniel Hill was apprenticed to the map maker, surveyor, publisher and globe maker Richard Cushee (1696-c1734) who worked at the sign of the Globe & Sun between Chancery Lane and St Dunstan’s Church, London.

 

nathaniel hill (fl.1746-1748) a 2 inch pocket globe:, signed 'a new terrestrial globe by nath hill 1754'

Nathaniel Hill (fl.1746-1748) a 2 inch pocket globe:, signed 'A New Terrestrial Globe by Nath Hill 1754'

 
Nathaniel Hill originally worked as a surveyor on the Fens in Yorkshire and also around London. In 1731 Richard Cushee took Nathaniel Hill on as an apprentice and from there he established himself as one of the finest globe makers of the 18th century. It is interesting to note that the globe displays California as a Peninsula and the North-West Atlantic Coast is titled ‘Unknown parts’. It would not be until over a century later that the ‘Northwest Passage’ would finally be known and not until 1906 when Roald Amundsen finally travelled the complete passage.
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Tuesday, July 23, 2019 3:17:32 PM (GMT Standard Time, UTC+00:00)  #
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